Kentucky Derby

Kentucky Derby

Known in the world of horse racing as “The Most Exciting Two Minutes In Sports” or “The Fastest Two Minutes in Sports” for its approximate duration, the Kentucky Derby is by far the most popular horseracing and betting events in the United States. Over 160,000 visitors from around the world gather on the first Saturday of May at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Kentucky, and tens of millions follow the race on TV and online.

Also called “The Run for the Roses” for the blanket of roses draped over the winner, the Derby is the first leg of the American Triple Crown and is followed by the Preakness Stakes, then the Belmont Stakes. Unlike the Preakness and Belmont Stakes, which took hiatuses in 1891-1893 and 1911-1912, respectively, the Kentucky Derby has been run every consecutive year since 1875.

Race information

Distance: 1 1⁄4 miles (10 furlongs; 2,012 m)

Record: 1:59 2⁄5 secs, Secretariat (1973)

Surface: Dirt

Track: Left-handed

Qualification: 3-year-old

Race Facts (Since 1976):

Fastest Time: 1:59:97

Largest Winning Margin: 6 3/4 lengths

Highest Winning: 127Most wins by a jockey

5 – Eddie Arcaro (1938, 1941, 1945, 1948, 1952)

5 – Bill Hartack (1957, 1960, 1962, 1964, 1969)

Most wins by a trainer

6 – Ben A. Jones (1938, 1941, 1944, 1948, 1949, 1952)

Most wins by an owner

8 – Calumet Farm (1941, 1944, 1948, 1949, 1952, 1957, 1958, 1968)

Stakes record

1:59.40 – Secretariat (1973)

Record Victory Margin

8 lengths – Assault (1946)

8 lengths – Whirlaway (1941)

Longest shot to win the Derby

91 to 1 – Donerail (1913)